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2013-03-16 • Ryan Updates Research

*SatNiteChat

Start: 21:19:05
End: 23:36:46
Chatters: jhonora, ryan, Seventies, vkn

jhonora: Good evening ryan

Seventies: hello jhonora

jhonora: Hi Seventies

Seventies: How are you? Enjoying spring break yet?

jhonora: Not yet, it will start next week

Seventies: ok just in time for Easter. Are you excited about the new pope?

jhonora: Yes, very excited, looking foward to where he will lead the Chuch

Seventies: That's good. He seems like a man of little fanfare.

jhonora: Yes, a very humble man He is from Argentina but Italian by heritage. The president of Argentina is of German stock. They recruited Europeans to "whiten" their population in the 30s and 40s

Seventies: Yes and were one of the countries in South America to practice Eugenics.

jhonora: Absolutely, it shows how far people will go to avoid dealing with blacks

Seventies: yep. There are hardly any Africans from Argentina except those that have immigrated to the country. RYAN!! Hey long time no see! I'd been thinking about you as of late. How are you doing? And are you and the family safe up there?

vkn: Howdy to all Seventies Ryan JHonora

Seventies: hi vkn!

ryan: Hello all.. I'm still around, just been hectic working etc. But I stay on my research..

Seventies: :) good to hear.

jhonora: Hello vkn

ryan: 70's. Thanks for thinking of me BTW. Hopefully you have some good info for me.. :)

vkn: Good for you Ryan any new discoveries

Seventies: I hope so as well... I think.. :)

ryan: Well, I've been resarching all decendants of my ggrandfather (I found a lost line in December) that was good. That would be 2 left unknown out of 6

Seventies: Awesome! All came from MS/TN?

ryan: Of course 70's.. both

Seventies: You never know... just had to ask.

ryan: how have you all been?

Seventies: cold, wet and snowy... other than that pretty good. Tell us about your lost line and if they left MS/TN during the great migration.

ryan: Well, there was Robert, Oliva, Ola (my ggrandmother), Tom, and Lizzie.. I've traced decendants for Ola and Tom, but Lizzie was a mystery. Found her, she (Lizzie or Elizabeth Pennington) married a William Evans, I found out she moved to Memphis. Robert and Olivia are still mysteries..

jhonora: The family name is Pennington?

ryan: Yes

jhonora: From which county of MS?

ryan: Most of the Penningtons came out of Sussex, VA, and migrated to north and south Carolina. Mine went to Nashville Some went on to Mississippi (Marshall County) where my folks went..

Seventies: What time frame were these migrations?

ryan: Well, Graves Pennington was the slave owner that went to Nashville from Susexx county. He was born about 1790, he died in Nashville 1854.. His sons took my great grandfather to Mississippi

Seventies: ah okay... good stuff ryan.

jhonora: I researched a family with a similar history of back and forth between Nashville and Ms, by the name of Bumpus/Bumpas

ryan: Yea, they left the tobacco trade for the riches of cotton as I understand..

Seventies: Did they have any unique records perhaps donated to a school about the white pennington family?

ryan: Graves Pennington was one of the early settlers around Nashville, he belonged to a malitia there, tasked to defend the new territory there. He went there around 1820 or so I guess. He was able to procure land along the banks of the Cumberland river. There's lots of info out there about him.

Seventies: nice

ryan: Have you looked at any of "the road to freedom" ? (on another subject)

Seventies: No I hadn't.

jhonora: I'll catch you all later!

Seventies: I've been hitting the gym nearly every night... except this week

ryan: thats a good thing, me.. I was, but slacking off for about 3 weeks thought I would start again today, and failed..

Seventies: I'm sitting here thinking what were my latest developments since you last came to chat...

ryan: yea

Seventies: You can do it Ryan! Ok let me start with the latest and work backwards. I went to the Nat'l Archives and got some good Pre-Freedman's Bureau stuff. It was just about untouched...

ryan: thanks.. gonna get my but in there in the morning. I've been pretty good for about 6 years, but I've his a spell. Well, I was in California last weekend, then Miami the weekend before, that through me off.. ok wow... more on the pre-freedmans..

Seventies: I found the place, Beverly Plantation, where my mom grew up and many of my family members live and I actually think that I found my gg grandfather Canada Galmore and his brother William on the list of workers in 1864...

ryan: wow, thats big..

Seventies: That is VERY big... I was in shock after actually reading through it. The name caught my attention so I copied the document. they were little boys at the time.

ryan: thats great.. thats why we do this.. right?

Seventies: yep... And people don't like these records because they say they are hard to find family and generally give more of a context of the era.

ryan: (may take a few years to get it, but when it comes, its a beautiful thing)

Seventies: Indeed ryan.

ryan: ok

Seventies: Now the records I looked at the pre-FB were M1914...

ryan: ok

Seventies: They cover MS, LA and AR and some TN I would say that they are definitely worth looking at if you have family in the area.

ryan: ok.. so what years is that? 1865 - 70?

Seventies: 1863 to the establishment of the Freedman's Bureau....

ryan: ok

Seventies: So these are military records, many of the outposts were run by the Provost Marshal And special liaisons

ryan: Well, thats great.. Thats right along the lines of what I've been looking at lately.

Seventies: Another document that I copied was a survey of the Natchez district. A minister had been having trouble getting marriages to be done. This was a direct correspondence of a set of marriage records I had copied and transcribed from Adams Co. last year... I was thrilled!

ryan: That last road to freedom I just told you about is pre freedman and freedman. It talks a lot about the Civil War contraband camps are you aware of those?

Seventies: Yes, I have been touching on some of those documents.

ryan: when you get a chance.. read through this. its very, very interesting to me..

Seventies: I've been actively looking at CW regimental records for the units in which my family members have served.

ryan: http://www.lastroadtofreedom.com/

Seventies: Adding to my bookmarks now.

ryan: It not only has lots of information on the Freedman, Contraband camps. But most of the info is also from Marshall county, with one of the stories about a possible ansetor that I'd been researching.. Africa Bailey

Seventies: Those Regimental records are not digitized at this time... and they need to be. There is some great information in there. Who is Africa Bailey? love that name...

ryan: Well, the girl who wrote the information Alisea Williams Mcloud wrote of 2 slaves, that went to Memphis to fight, left thier plantation in Marshall county.. One of the slaves was Africa Baily. I had already been looking at him, through the Freedmans's papers. Long story short, during reconstruction, he became a very sucessfull preacher in Memphis.

Seventies: ok

ryan: I had already been researching him as an Ansestor (before her story)

Seventies: That's incredible!

ryan: yea, I thought so.

Seventies: So now you have the slave owner, plantation, etc. etc. Did Alisea say anything particular about him. Such as his status on the plantation, where he originally came from??

ryan: well.. He had a son name Tom Bailey That is my great grandfathers name

Seventies: whoa!! And the other slave that left, were they related to Africa?

ryan: My tom Bailey married Ola Pennington, he was born in Tennessee around 1867 or so (same as Africa's son).

Seventies: Ah... I see the possible connection here.

ryan: I just have not connected the dots. He could only be son to 2 people in that area, Africa is one of them. Africa dies of Yellow fever in 1878

Seventies: wow.

ryan: My Tom Bailey, Turns up in Marshall county and Marrys Ola in 1888 Anyway, I'm trying to confirm if Tom is related to Africa Bailey Seems just about everyone in that area died of yellow fever in 1878

Seventies: Ok your folks Tom and Ola are right along +/- a couple years to my great grandparents George and Lucy Callen in AL... I'd been glancing over them a little tonight.

ryan: ok

Seventies: Yes, I recall you gave me a link to a history about the yellow fever along there.

ryan: ok

Seventies: I think that my family member may have passed because of the yellow fever during that time....

ryan: ok

Seventies: Now the Yellow fever along Memphis was only in 1878 or was it over a few years timeframe. My people showed up in Shelby Co. TN in the 1880 census. Grandparents, children and grandchildren living in a single household.

ryan: main one was like sept - october 1878. though there were breakouts other years

Seventies: ok Yea, they didn't live in Memphis proper. I think they lived out in a rural area of the county.

ryan: here's another link.. This tells you all about Africa Baily and the contraband camps. Was interesting to me when I found it, cause I already knew who he was.. http://hastac.org/blogs/amcleod/2012/06/21/eaton-bailey-williams-freedpeoples-transcription-project-update

Seventies: Nice...

ryan: ok, your folks were then likely collierville like mine

Seventies: Maybe. I don't know what made them leave SW Mississippi, but they did and the entire family in-laws and grands moved to Shelby Co, MS

ryan: tn

Seventies: I meant TN.. lol

ryan: lol

Seventies: I'm so used to typing MS.. lol

ryan: I knew.. Your family was strange like that. Meaning the started at the bottom of the state and turned up at the top..

Seventies: I mean, they were darn near in Louisiana.

ryan: yea had another big find...

Seventies: ok

ryan: So, had ansestors (of course, Marshall county) owned by the Bonner family. Well, the Bonner family was a wealthy family in the area. long story short.. Charles Bonner was a Dr and a planter. He treated confederates during the war in Holly Springs. He had a daughter he became famous for her writings about southern life during that period.. Her name was Katie "sherwood" Bonner.. They owned my folks too..

Seventies: nice...

ryan: did not know that untill recently

Seventies: Now you can get some other info on your folks from her writings as well. that's good stuff!

ryan: no

Seventies: Ok so here are my updates...

ryan: ok go ahead (she wrote fictional stories about fictional charactors, based on the time.. mostly black charators)

Seventies: I found a long unknown family member who'd died in the CW shortly after joining the USCTs ahhh hmmm wonder how much was based in fact....

ryan: wow yea, I know..

Seventies: I found him via Ancestry and looking up his mother's name.

ryan: ok

Seventies: Turns out his mother Charity Rounds received his pension

ryan: cool thats one thing I have not found, a connection to a USCT..

Seventies: I ordered his pension file and found out info about Charity Rounds. and I got his military discharge/DC

ryan: they would be my instant hero

Seventies: Verified some oral history in the family.

ryan: ok

Seventies: I also got copies of the inventories of their slave holding family. Though when he enlisted he went by Charles Rounds Jr. his enslaved name was Chism. And get this, he was named after his maternal grandfather...

ryan: ok

Seventies: Turns out my 3rd great grandmothers' family had been owned by this slaveholding family for a total of 4 generations.

ryan: wow

Seventies: I got all of their names and a partial listing of the children.

ryan: where?

Seventies: So some of these folks have been here since the late 1700's This family Ellis-Farrar had plantations in SW MS and Louisiana.

ryan: ok, so they settled down there that long ago.. interesting

Seventies: They kept their enslaved in the family. The family who had this inventory was the descendant of the last farm manager they had before the CW This family received a Spanish land grant in Louisiana. One of the largest slave holding families in that part of the state

ryan: ok, thats right. Someone was spanish or moved to Mexico from that family.. right?

Seventies: Not this line...

ryan: oh

Seventies: This is my great-grandmother's line. My great-grandfather, her husband's line some came from MX. They also served in the USCTs there were three of them Milly, Thomas and Edward (Ned). Thomas and Ned served in the USCT.

ryan: ok.. for me, Africa Bailey is my first chance of connecting to the USCT. But, have not confirmed him. Check this out.. excerpt from the writeup : Africa Bailey, born a slave in Southampton County, Virginia around 1815, and Daniel Walker Williams, also born a slave in Spotsylvania County, Virginia, would have been acquainted with Eaton since both freedmen enlisted in the 63rd Regiment (Co. K) (formerly the 9th Louisiana) otherwise known as the Invalid Corps in which Eaton was first colonel and chaplain. The I.C., referred to by Eaton less pejoratively as The Home Guard, was composed of men fit for garrison duty but not for field service. It was a unit that matched both Eaton’s and Bailey and Williams’s purposes well. The 63rd would see very little, if any, field service, its soldiers not traveling far beyond Memphis.

Seventies: I also found another ancestor, James Galmore, served in the USCTs..

ryan: (you have lots)

Seventies: Yep.. I found one and in about a year I found several more. MS was a hotbed for USCT service.

ryan: not for me so far..

Seventies: ok wait a minute, I'm looking at this 9th LA and my James Galmore also has it listed on his service record card...

ryan: this is where Africa Bailey gets close to home for me : Bailey and Williams, husbands and fathers, had been acquainted for almost twenty years at the start of the war. Both had recently been owned by Elizabeth Herndon Hull of Marshall County, Mississippi, paternal great grandmother of Edward Hull “Boss” Crump, Jr., former mayor of Memphis. While Crump’s grandfather, William Crump, was a staunch Unionist, his great uncle William Hull, sixth son of Elizabeth and through inheritance owner of Bailey and Williams, served in the Confederacy. At the start of the war, Bailey and Williams would have lived on William Hull’s Greenwood plantation for many years, Williams for certain since the founding of the county following the Chickasaw Cession, which spurred the family’s movement west. Williams was raised in Mississippi; Bailey, ten years Williams's senior, may have been purchased before or after the Hull family’s migration. In either case, Williams and Bailey both were living at Greenwood in March 1863, when Union fo

Seventies: oh this is great information ryan!

ryan: That is from Alisea Williams (last road to freedom)

Seventies: So she is a descendant of Williams.

ryan: I went a found the probate records for her.

Seventies: ok

ryan: yes, correct what I don't understand is both were owned by the Hull family but What did Africa take the Bailey name and her Daniel Willams take the Williams name

Seventies: Probably because it was his name before he was sold..

ryan: yea I suppose

Seventies: Sounds like he was big enough to know it and remember it. That may be the key as to where he came from.. Or his people back in Virginia.

ryan: yea.. So I peer more into his life. The guy was something else. Started the biggest churches in Memphis during reconstruction, escaped slave, went o memphis, joined the USCT..

Seventies: Yes that is very incredible. I hope you all are related. :)

ryan: and when he died of yellow fever, was notable in papers in Chicago and Ohio While these two fugitives more likely than not journeyed to Memphis together by train or on foot, their paths would diverge somewhat as Bailey sought to lead his fellow freedpeople on a road to Christian faith and Williams looked to succeed in farming anyway, enough of that. read it at your leisure

Seventies: No that's good information... Do you go on any genealogy facebook pages?

ryan: have you looked a the slave narratives? (not much on FB)

Seventies: Yes years ago... almost 20. lol Picked them up again last year though

ryan: ok, I'm hooked. trying to finish all the ones from Marshall county the stories they tell..

Seventies: Let me tell you, I picked up one from Oklahoma and went right to one with the lady who was owned in Autauga Co, AL by a Clem Lanier... I was floored! My Laniers are from Autauga Co.

ryan: yea..

Seventies: The stories are great. My favorites are the Carolinas...

ryan: I got one like that too..

Seventies: I had been begging my college library, I work at a univ., to get some copies. Finally I just gave up and downloaded them from the Gutenberg free library online

ryan: One was owned by the Penningtons in Nashville and Memphis.. I swear she was owned by the same family. she said her masters name was Fanny, and so was our slave owner (Fanny Pennignton)

Seventies: wow. They had to be wealthy for sure. Now none of the people owned by this Ellis-Farrar family gave any interviews that I came across.

ryan: yea, even tells how Fanny's husband died, and how her mother died taking care of him. Well, William died (my owner) suddenly, as did his brother in 1853. I just don't have a firm connection on her..

Seventies: ok You have been getting some good stuff ryan...

ryan: yea, been productive really can't complain but you know how it is..

Seventies: Me not so much... teetering on if I should move forward or if I should stop.

ryan: no can't stop I have been finding stuff (Like Lizzie) thought she was gone forever.. and boom

Seventies: That's great...

ryan: I connected with a decendant of my grgrgrandfather/mother Daniel Pool. on Ancestry

Seventies: Nice!

ryan: Long story short (I have this line down too). His grandfather was my great grandmothers sister. His mother is alive, I spoke to her, she knew my great grandmother, and she told me all about each and every one of them.

Seventies: Isn't that awesome!

ryan: my thier (Carrie and Will Pools) mother died when will was young. My great grandmother Carrie raised her father (see them on 1900) she was the one that told me that Dan Pools Wife was a Bonner (which I had no idea) I think that was my biggest find, to talk to her..

Seventies: Isn't it always the biggest find to talk to the elders? :)

ryan: yes, because she is the youngest of Wills kids, the rest are past. She's right there in Memphis

Seventies: That's great. I'm so glad that you are moving along in your research ryan.

ryan: They had another brother name George Pool.. He was one of the older ones..

Seventies: Were there two sets of Pool children?

ryan: Now, I new something was up with George, cause he lived with Carrie even when he was in his 50's/

Seventies: Did the cousin shed any light on that??

ryan: she tells me George was Def and Dumb.. He died in Hardemen Asylem.. I saw a record for that, but was not sure before she confirmed it..

Seventies: ok

ryan: (West Tn Asylem) I was floored. To be talking to someone who could speak first hand..

Seventies: Did they indicate that on the census? Seems like it should've been on at least one of them.

ryan: Well, maybe I missed it. But, he was living with Carrie 1900, 1910, 1920, 1930 then dissapears (to the asylem)..

Seventies: That's sad.

ryan: he died there

Seventies: what year? after 1940?

ryan: I had been researching the pools (my paternal grandfathers's mother is Carrie) he died in the 40's yes

Seventies: This is all good stuff ryan. Awaiting your book to be published.. :)

ryan: yea.. lots of new info, have not had time to document much other than collecting files

Seventies: I hear rustling in this bedroom. Keeping my nephew tonight and he's 3... brb

ryan: ok

Seventies: ok back. My son and nephew are watching Thomas the train on Netflix... and my nephew is laying in bed with his legs crossed...eyes glued on the tube... lol kids

ryan: ok I got the house to myself, thats why I'm having a marathon.. lol.. Wife is in Michigan.

Seventies: lol I wish!

ryan: Daughter in Atlanta, another down away at school by ST Louis and my son is spending the night at his buddies house.

Seventies: and you've never felt so alone.. lol

ryan: I should'nt. I was in San Jose last week..

Seventies: nice. I wish I could go somewhere warm... it snowed yet again in NY

ryan: yea, flurries here too.

Seventies: Just enough to make it dangerous. I'm also just getting over a cold... I'm so over winter.

ryan: Week before was Miami.. My nephew lives down there, and was married..

Seventies: rub.it.in. lol

ryan: http://onefast.org/tonyr/AstonandChristineLiyanarchiWedding322012/

Seventies: That's an interesting surname...

ryan: this is me http://onefast.org/tonyr/AstonandChristineLiyanarchiWedding322012/dsc02702.html yes.. let me tell you about that one

Seventies: Gorgeous family.

ryan: again.. Long story short.. My sister's ex husband was from Sri Lanka

Seventies: ok

ryan: Thats where the name came from BUT as we do.... My sister changed the spelling lol

Seventies: So your nephew is Blasian.

ryan: yea

Seventies: lol @ as we do I can't tell that he is... wow.

ryan: as I understand it.. That lighthouse has some rich history..

Seventies: I was wondering where the wedding had taken place.

ryan: No kidding the "african" took over size etc. but he looks just lke his father.. Key Biscayne, and Island right off Miami..

Seventies: ah okay.

ryan: I understand that lighthouse was a stop on the underground railroad

Seventies: Down to the Caribbean?

ryan: yes

Seventies: Nice! We don't often hear about that aspect of the UGRR I would really like to learn more about that.

ryan: yea, I was surprised. A white guy from down there started telling me all this, I was instantly tuned in

Seventies: At the wedding?

ryan: yea.. Lighthouse tours: Although the lighthouse is open to the public from Thursday-Monday, if you would like to go on a guided tour, it is free and takes place at 10:00am and 1:00pm Thursday-Monday. There are 109 steps to the top, so bring your comfortable walking shoes! The lighthouse is the oldest building in South Florida built in 1825 to serve as a navigational aid and was the site of an Indian War and part of the Underground Railroad. here is an article on it http://www.visitflorida.com/articles/along-floridas-underground-railroad-slaves-won-freedom-for-themselves

Seventies: Anothr nice bit of information. You came ready to dish today... :)

ryan: yea, its been a while.. thanks for putting up with me

Seventies: This was an excellent chat with you tonight ryan. No problem. I'm sleeping in tomorrow. :) I wish I had more to share.

ryan: same here.. I won't be so long. I've been trying to break away to the lunch bunch, but been crazy at work. But, nice talking to you too.. Hang in there, don't give up, that big break is right in front of you and you don't know it yet. Anyway, ttyl..

Seventies: You can check out my records online at thefamilygriotrepository.blogspot.com

ryan: ok, will link it now.. bye..

Seventies: night!


18 Dec 2002 :: 1 Feb 2009
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