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African-Native American Research Forum Archive

Re: dna testing
In Response To: Re: dna testing ()

I may have no right to contribute to this blog, especially since I am not of Native American decent and a year late. However, my husband, though only 1/16th Cherokee is a "real" Cherokee according to official standards and I feel I need to make comment on some of what was said. I want to applaud rwstreb on his comments and not losing his temper. I too was dismayed at the narrow mindedness and dare I say prejudice of David Cornsilk. David seems to disregard that because he never heard of other than Cherokeeís abandoning their heritage that extenuating circumstances might exist. It may be word of mouth that we learned of my husbandís Native American heritage, which may or not be truthful or the facts distorted. Correct me if I am wrong, but isn't that how all important facts were handed down, by storytelling from one generation to the next until Sequoyah wrote down the language?

As the 'story' goes, renegade Cherokee's were continuously raiding a white encampment (an act I can understand with food and supplies diminished by the Europeans). The settler's at the Fort finally had enough of this and executed their own raid and killed all the Indians in that splinter group, butchering starving, usually peaceful Indians as punishment for a handful of people's indiscretions. All that is, but one, a young girl whom a couple in the town took pity on and raised as their own. As David may say, this may be a romantic notion, but I've found that truth is usually more interesting than fiction. This child became my husband's great, great, great grandmother. It is true that there is not much proof that she was Cherokee since her parents gave her a new name and did not register her with the government for fear that she would be taken away. The only identifiers are a couple of pictures and a small wooden bead doll that she supposedly made which was handed down for generations until it came to my devoted and loving care. And, yes, she did eventually marry a white man. Under the circumstances can we crucify her or her decedents for abandoning their ancestry? I think not.


18 Dec 2002 :: 14 Nov 2008
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