Alexander, Madison , Pulaski

  St. Clair 

 

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ILLINOIS AFRIGENEAS

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PULASKI COUNTY

UNDERGROUND RAILROAD HISTORY

 

 

From: "The Underground Railroad in Illinois"


A map in Professor Siebert's book, showing the routes and principal stations of the "Undergound Railroad," makes mention of the following places in Illinois, in addition to those already referred to: Carlinville, in Macoupin County; Payson and Mendon, in Adams; Washington, in Tazewell; Metamora, in Woodford; Magnolia, in Putnam; Galesburg, in Knox; Princeton (the home of Owen Lovejoy and the Bryants), in Bureau; and many more. Ottawa appears to have been the meeting point of a number of lines, as well as the home of a strong colony of practical abolitionists. CAIRO also became an important transfer station for fugitives arriving by river, after the completion of the Illinois Central Railroad, especially as it offered the speediest way of reaching Chicago, towards which nearly all the lines converged. It was here that the fugitives could be most safely disposed of by placing them upon vessels, which, without stopping at intermediate ports, could soon land them on Canadian soil.

"The History of Alexander, Union Pulaski Counties, Illinois",
Biographical
section, pages 9-10.
Edited by William Henry Perrin, 1883

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WALTER L. BRISTOL

"In all communities are found men who rise equal if not superior to their surroundings, and instead of being entirely the creatures of circumstance, by their native energy and perseverance, so mold and direct their business interests as, to a great extent, to govern circumstances and make them sub serve their immediate interests. The city of Cairo is not without its portion of such men. Taking front rank in this class is the subject of these lines, Walter L. BRISTOL.

He was born in Erie County, Penn., on the 6th of May, 1839 (sic-his birthdate was 2 May 1836) and is the son of Lester BRISTOL and Adelaide PETTIBONE. (sic--his mother's name was Anzolette Cleland) The father was of German parentage (sic--not so) and was married in Pennsylvania, and about 1844 (sic--it was 1840) removed to Wisconsin, where the mother died in 1849 (sic--she died 4 July 1844). The father lived to the age of seventy-seven years, and died in Iowa about 1870.(sic--he died at the age of 70 in 1871 in Shell Rock, Iowa) Adelaide Pettibone must have been a relative, as William Pettibone was married his mother's sister Lydia Cleland.

They had a family of five children - Walter L. BRISTOL, of Cairo, Ill.: Edward BRISTOL, of Dakota; Adeline, deceased wife of A. STONEBRAKER; George BRISTOL, of Wisconsin; and Lucius BRISTOL, of Iowa. Mr. W. L. BRISTOL was reared on the farm, and chiefly by strangers. In 1859, having grown to manhood, he went to Chicago, and until 1863 was employed in the dry goods house of Potter Palmer, of that city. Having saved a little money, he came to Cairo in 1863,(sic--it was a couple of years earlier) and soon after associated with L. W. STILWELL in the grocery trade, the partnership existing until April, 1875, when Mr. STILWELL retired from the firm, which was known as BRISTOL & STILWELL. Since the latter date, Mr. BRISTOL has conducted the business alone, and with marked success.


In 1881, he erected a neat two-story brick business house at No. 32 on Eighth street, where he keeps a select stock of groceries, provisions
and Queens-ware. In addition to his city business, he has a grain and fruit farm of 243 acres in Pulaski County.

He was married in Bristol, Wis., on the 25th of December, 1866, to Miss Louisa S. WATKINS, daughter of George and Maria (CHAMBERLAIN) WATKINS-the former born in England in 1811, and the latter was born in 1814 in Connecticut. These parents, in 1844 (then having three children), removed from the State of New York, to Kenosha County Wis., where the father engaged in farming until his death, which occurred in 1851. His wife and four of a family of nine children still survive him. Mrs. BRISTOL was born in the State of New York in 1844.

Their family (that of Walter and Louisa BRISTOL)consists of Walter W., born October 2, 1867; Willis E., born October 23, 1868; Louis T., born September 1, 1872; and John B. BRISTOL, born May 15, 1877. He is a member of the I. 0. 0. F., and both husband and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church of Cairo."

Submitted by: Sharilyn Whitaker
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Placed online: 13 September 1999 | Updated: 7 May 2001
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