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AfriGeneas Slave Research Forum Archive

GA Family (Slave Data)

I need info on the private collection this information was taken from.
Thanks
Index]
Slaves-Wayne Co., Brooks Co., Thomas Co., GA

Some African-American Families of Wayne Co., Brooks Co. and Thomas Co., GA

Sources not otherwise noted are in private collection, Atlanta, GA

[The following note was written by Judge Henry William Hopkins of Thomasville,
Thomas County, GA. No date is recorded on the note, but it was probably
written in the 1930's. It is a record of people remembered by Judge Hopkins
who were owned by his father, Dr. Thomas Spalding Hopkins (1818-1904). Dr.
Hopkins owned a plantation, "Sherwood", in that part of Wayne County, GA that
is now Brantley County. Some of the people listed moved to Brooks and Thomas
County in 1864, when the Hopkins family sought refuge from the Civil War in
Thomasville. At least one family, named here as Grace and Sandy Berry (but
otherwise known as Grace and Sandy Jenkins), remained to oversee the Hopkins
plantation in Wayne Co.]

"Some of the names of slaves owned by Father that I remember.

Men

Big Peter, carpenter
Little Peter, sugar maker
Steven Jenkins, laborer
Steven Hopkins, laborer
Sandy Berry, foreman on farm
George Johnson, coachman
Conrad Johnson, son of George, assisted his father
Jim Crow, handy man
Tully, yard man 'and we boys possum hunter'
Tamany, old native African

Women

Grace Berry, wife of Sandy Berry
Judy
Tena, nurse to the Hopkins children
Phoeby
Ella
Chloey"

[The following list includes any further information I have been able to
discover about those families that are named above:]

Men:

Big Peter, carpenter - no further information

Little Peter, sugar maker - no further information

Steven Jenkins, laborer - Will of William D. Jenkins, 1858: "I will and
bequeath to the wife and children of Dr. Thomas S. Hopkins but in no way
subject to any debts of said Dr. Hopkins the following named negroes with
their future increase and issue Viz - Old George, Mack, Sally, Jim, Frank,
Phebe, Harry, Robert, Stephen, Dinah, Billy, Sandy, Grace, Toby, March and
Dick."

Steven Hopkins, laborer - no further information

Sandy Berry, foreman on farm - [info. on Sandy (Berry) Jenkins is extensive.
I will soon be uploading this info. seperately.]

George Johnson, coachman - From 1938 interview w/ Octavius Hopkins, son of
Thomas Spalding Hopkins: "Stepny Livingston bro. to George Johnson - 2 high
grade negroes given to T.S.H. [Thomas Spalding Hopkins], butler & his son,
Conrad, carriage driver."
family moved to Thomasville: "I also will and bequeath to F.W. & C.B. Hopkins
the following negro men - viz: George, aged about 45 years & Conrad his son
aged about 22 years." This places George Johnson's date of birth @ 1818 and
Conrad's date of birth @1841.

Conrad Johnson, son of George, assisted his father- See above entry for
additional info.
A Conrad Johnson is enumerated in the 1870 Census of GA, (Thomas County, p.
74). I have not yet checked the actual census record, but according to the
1870 Census Index for GA, this Conrad Johnson is living in Thomasville, Thomas
County. He is 30 years old, black, male. It would be worthwhile to check
this census record. His father might very well be living in the household.
There is no George Johnson of an appropriate age listed as head of a household
in the 1870 Census Index.

Jim Crow, handy man - no further information

Tully, yard man "and we boys possum hunter" no further information

Tamany, old native African - The following note had no date but was filed with
Hopkins family data from 1923. It is probably from an interview with Judge
Hopkins.
"Old Tammany, the African, was brought over on the 'Wanderer', the last vessel
that ran the blockade of slave trade into U.S. [In 1858]
"Capt. Sam Brockington, was making for Brunswick, pursued by Revenue Cutter
off St. Simon's, & landed slaves on Jekyll Is. The natives from the mainland
& Island wd. come in canoes & row boats, jerk up a negro; throw him in, & off
with his prize - Tammany was bought by [space in document is blank but
possibly refers to Dr. Thomas Spalding Hopkins, though it my refer to a prior
owner] and built himself a hut in which he lived apart from other negroes -
children afraid of him."

Women:

Grace Berry, wife of Sandy Berry (a.k.a. Sandy Jenkins)

Judy - this may be the Judy mentioned in the 1847 marriage settlement of T.S.
Hopkins and Jane Elizabeth Gignilliat. That Judy was "aged about twenty three
/23/ years". That would place her date of birth around 1824. She was owned by
Miss Gignilliat prior to the marriage.

Tena, nurse to the Hopkins' children - no further info.

Phoeby - From 1938 Interview of Octavius Hopkins: "Tammany & Phoebe were
native Africans Phoebe lived to be 110."
children of Dr. Thomas S. Hopkins but in no way subject to any debts of said
Dr. Hopkins the following named negroes with their future increase and issue
Viz - Old George, Mack, Sally, Jim, Frank, Phebe, Harry, Robert, Stephen,
Dinah, Billy, Sandy, Grace, Toby, March and Dick."

Ella - no further info.

Chloey - this may be the Chloe mentioned in the 1847 marriage settlement of
T.S. Hopkins and Jane Elizabeth Gignilliat. That Chloe was "aged about twenty
/20/ years". That would place her date of birth around 1827. She had a three
year old daughter, Ann. Ann would have been born around 1844. They were
owned by Miss Gignilliat prior to her marriage.

[Additional Names of People Owned by the Hopkins, taken from various sources]

Pompey and Louisa are listed in the 1847 marriage settlement of T.S. Hopkins
and Jane Elizabeth Gignilliat: "Pompey, a negro man about 55 years of age,
and Louisa his wife aged about fifty /50/ years". They were owned by Miss
Gignilliat prior to her marriage.
Pompey would therefore have been born around 1792. Louisa would have been
born around 1797.
Louisa is also mentioned the 1823 division of the estate of James Gignilliat.
Valued at $300, she is listed under Lot #2. "Pompy" (valued at $500) was
listed in Lot #2 as well, suggesting that they were already married at that
time. Lot#2 went to the children of John Gignilliat, Sr., one of whom was
Jane Elizabeth Gignilliat (Mrs. T.S. Hopkins).
See entry below for "Dan", possible son of Pompey and Louisa.

Prince is listed in the 1847 marriage settlement of T.S. Hopkins and Jane
Elizabeth Gignilliat as "a boy, aged about sixteen /16/ years." Prince would
therefore have been born around 1831. He was owned by Miss Gignilliat prior
to her marriage.

Asia is listed in the 1847 marriage settlement of T.S. Hopkins and Jane
Elizabeth Gignilliat as "a man aged about sixty /60/ years". Asia would
therefore have been born around 1787. He was owned by Miss Gignilliat prior
to her marriage. He was bequeathed to her by her brother, Scott Gignilliat of
Glynn County, GA with the stipulation that she was not allowed to sell Asia,
but "shall only use and possess the right to dispose of the same by will."
(Unfortunately, I can't locate my copy of Scott Gignilliat's will, however, it
is located in Glynn County, GA probate records, available on microfilm at the
Georgia Archives, Atlanta, GA.)
Asia was bequeathed to Scott Gignilliat in the 1823 division of the estate of
his cousin James Gignilliat of Glynn Co., GA. Asia's value was given as $450
at that time. He is listed in Lot#1 with "Beller" also referred to as
"Yellow Bella", value $300 and Harry, value $200.

Dan is listed in the 1847 marriage settlement of T.S. Hopkins and Jane
Elizabeth Gignilliat as "a man aged about twenty two /22/ years". This
suggests that Dan was born around 1825, however other information suggests
that he was born slightly prior this.
Dan was bequeathed to Jane Elizabeth Gignilliat by her brother, Scott
Gignilliat of Glynn County, GA with the stipulation that she was not allowed
to sell Dan, but "shall only use and possess the right to dispose of the same
by will."
A Daniel is listed in the 1823 division of the estate of Scott's cousin James
Gignilliat of Glynn Co., GA.
Daniel was among those people bequeathed "to the children of John Gignilliat",
father of Jane Elizabeth and Scott.
Dan's value was given as $100, suggesting that he was a young child at that
time. He is listed with Pompy and "Louise" (see above). Perhaps this
indicates that Dan was their son.

Jim is listed in the 1844 inventory and appraisal of the estate of John
Gignilliat, Jr., brother of Jane Elizabeth Gignilliat. Jim is listed as a
boy, but no age is given. He is valued at $150. He is included in Lot #7 in
the 1850 division of John Gignilliat Jr.'s estate.This lot was bequeathed to
Thomas S. Hopkins, husband of Jane Elizabeth Gignilliat. The three people in
this group are "Maria, a woman,$400 - Jim, $200 - George, $150 - Chester,
$100." The values listed may suggest that Maria was the mother of the three
young boys.

Chester is listed in the 1850 division of the estate of John Gignilliat, Jr.,
brother of Jane Elizabeth Gignilliat. He is valued at $100, which may
indicate that he is a very young boy. Since he does not appear in the 1844
inventory and appraisal of the estate of John Gignilliat, Jr., he was probably
born sometime between 1844 and 1850. He was listed in Lot #7, bequeathed to
T.S. Hopkins, husband of Jane Elizabeth Gignilliat. The other people in this
group are Maria, a woman,$400 - Jim, $200 - George, $150. The values listed
may suggest that Maria was the mother of the three young boys.

Peggy is listed in the 1847 marriage settlement of T.S. Hopkins and Jane
Elizabeth Gignilliat as "a girl, aged about ten /10/ years." This suggests
that Peggy was born around 1837. She was owned by Miss Gignilliat prior to
the marriage.

Elizabeth is listed in the 1847 marriage settlement of T.S. Hopkins and Jane
Elizabeth Gignilliat as "a girl aged about twelve /12/ years". This suggests
that Elizabeth was born around 1835. She was owned by Miss Gignilliat prior
to the marriage.

Maria - In the 1844 inventory and appraisal of the estate of John Gignilliat,
Jr., brother of Jane Elizabeth
Gignilliat. Though no age is given, Maria is listed as a woman valued at
$400. She was in Lot #7, bequeathed to Thomas Spalding Hopkins, husband of
Jane Elizabeth Gignilliat. The other people in her group appear to be
children, Jim ($200), George ($150), Chester($100). They are probably her
children.

Tamar - The sex of Tamar is not given in any document. In Black Names in
America: Origins and Usage, (collected by Newbell Niles Puckett and edited by
Murray Heller, Boston, G.K. Hall & Co. p.451), the name Tamar is identified
as being a woman's name of African origin (Arabic). Tamar is listed in the
1847 marriage settlement of T.S. Hopkins and Jane Elizabeth Gignilliat as
"aged about seventy /70/ years". This suggests that she was born around 1771.
Tamar was owned by Miss Gignilliat prior to the marriage.
Tamar was bequeathed to Jane Elizabeth Gignilliat by her brother, Scott
Gignilliat of Glynn County, GA with the stipulation that she was not allowed
to sell Tamar, but "shall only use and possess the right to dispose of the
same by will."
Tamar is one of three people bequeathed to Jane Elizabeth Gignilliat by her
brother Scott with the stipulation that they never be sold. The other two
were Asia, b. @ 1787 and Dan, probably b. @.1823. There is possibly some
family relationship between these three people. Dan is certainly young enough
to have been Tamar's son.
She is probably the Tamah, valued at $350, listed in the 1823 division of the
estate of James Gignilliat, cousin of Scott Gignilliat. She was listed in Lot
#4 of people who were bequeathed to the children of John Gignilliat, Sr. The
other two names that appear in Lot #4 are Primus ($300) and Joe ($350).

Documents Cited Above

1. Will of James Gignilliat, of Glynn Co., GA, written Feb. 27, 1821 and
filed May 3, 1821. Book D, 1810-1843, Glynn Co. Ordinary Estate Records,
Wills, Inventories and Appraisements. p.53.
He leaves all property to "the children of my uncles John May Gignilliat and
Henry Gignilliat to be divided in equal proportions among them." His
executors were Dr. James G. Pepper & John May Gignilliat.

2. Division of the Estate of James Gignilliat, Glynn Co., GA, Jan.17, 1823.
Book D, 1810-1843, Glynn Co. Ordinary Estate Records, Wills, Inventories and
Appraisements. p.144.
"We the subscribers being appointed by the Court to divide the Estate of James
Gignilliat according to the will we find there are Seven heirs five of Mr.
John Gignilliats [sic] and two of Mr. Henry Gignilliat and we divide the same
as follows..."

Lot#1 - drawn by John Gignilliat on behalf of his children
Harry$200
Beller $300
Asia$450

Lot#2 - drawn by John Gignilliat on behalf of his children

Pompy$500
Louise $300
Daniel$100

Lot#3 - drawn by John Gignilliat on behalf of his children

Moses$500
Chance$300
Hannah$150

Lot#4 - drawn by John Gignilliat on behalf of his children
Primus$300
Joe$250
Tamah$350

Lot#5 - drawn by John Gignilliat on behalf of his children

Aquila$375
Adam$375
Beck$175

Lot#6 - drawn by Henry Gignilliat on behalf of his children
Jim$500
Rachel$300
George$100

Lot#7 - drawn by Henry Gignilliat on behalf of his children
Bellah$450
Francis$300
Simon$150

James Gignilliat's bequest to William and Norman P. Gignilliat divided as
follows, Oct. 18, 1837. Book D, 1810-1843, Glynn Co. Ordinary Estate Records,
Wills, Inventories and Appraisements. p.232

William's: Norman's:
Jim$525 Frank$550
Bella$400 Rachel$400
Simon$525 Salina$250
Nancy$350 Joe$150
Francis Jr.$100
George$450

3. Inventory and appraisement of the estate of John Gignilliat,Jr., Glynn
County, GA. July 24, 1844. Book E, 1844-1853, Glynn Co. Ordinary Estate
Records, Wills, Inventories and Appraisements. p.20.

Charles - negro man, $400
Louisa - negro woman, $350
Nickalus -negro boy, $350
Loucinda -negro girl, $300
George - negro boy, $300
Primus -" " man, $400
Beck - " " woman, $400
Joe - " " boy, $250
Chance - " " boy, $200
Betsy - " " girl, $150
Bella - " " infant, $ 50
Maria - " " woman, $400
Cloey - " " girl, $300
Emma - " " girl, $300
Jim - " " boy, $150
George -" " infant, $ 50
Hercules -" " man, $400
Dale -" " woman, $350
William - " " boy, $200
Bella - " " girl, $250

4. Distribution of Estate of John Gignilliat,Jr., Glynn County, GA. Book E,
1844-1853, Glynn Co. Ordinary Estate Records, Wills, Inventories and
Appraisements. p.173. [Check microfilm for year and day.]

There were 7 "distributees" who drew lots for slaves.
Lot #1 M.C. Gignilliat...Charles & his wife Louisa$900
Lot #2 I.W. Frost........Nicholas$600
Lucinda$400
Lot #3 S.C. Gignilliat..."Boy named Yellow George"$500
Chloe, a woman$450
Lot #4 J.H. & ...........Primus$600
Robert D. Hall a boy Joe$300
Lot #5 H.G. Gignilliat...Beck$500
2 boys, Chance$300
and Washington$100
Lot #6 John Gignilliat...Betsy$250
Leah$200
May$150
Emma$200
Sally $125
Lot #7 T.S. Hopkins......Maria, a woman$400
Jim $200
George$150
Chester$100

5.1847, Marriage Settlement of Thomas Spalding Hopkins and Jane Elizabeth
Gignilliat. Transcript of original in private collection, Atlanta, GA.

[p.1]
"No.4.
Georgia
Glynn County
"This Indenture of three parts made and returned this fourth day of November
in the year of our Lord One Thousand eight hundred and forty seven, between
Thomas S. Hopkins of said State and County of the first part; Jane Elizabeth
Gignilliat of said State and County of the second part; and Henry G.
Gignilliat of the said state and county, of the third part, witnesseth, that
the said Thomas S. Hopkins for and in consideration of the marriage to be had
and solemnized between him, the said Thomas S. Hopkins of the first part, and
the said Jane Elizabeth Gignilliat of the second part, does for himself, his
heirs, Executors, Administrators and assigns, covenant grant and agree that a
house and lot in the town of Brunswick in the county and state aforesaid,
known as Lots no - 912 & 913 in the plat of the said town, with the
appurtenances thereto belonging and appertaining and eleven negroes to wet;
Pompey a neg-

[p.2]
"No. 4
"grown man about 55 years of age, and Louisa his wife aged about
fifty/50/years; Judy, aged about twenty three /23/ years; Chloe, aged about
twenty /20/ years and Ann her child, aged about three /3/ years; Prince, a
boy, aged about sixteen /16/ years; Peggy, a girl, aged about ten /10/ years.
Elizabeth a girl aged about twelve /12/ years; Asia a man aged about sixty
/60/ years; Tamar, aged about seventy /70/ years and Dan a man aged about
twenty two /22/ years, now in the possession of said J. Elizabeth Gignilliat,
with the future issue and increase of the females, and all other property
which may at any time said J. Elizabeth Gignilliat by her father or other
person by will or otherwise, shall form [?] and remain to be her separate
property and estate, and shall not in law or equity be subject to the payment
of the debts of the said Thomas S. Hopkins, or be subject to be sold and
conveyed by him, but right and title of said property shall be vested in Henry
G. Gignilliat, for the use and benefit of said J. Elizabeth

[p.3]
"No. 4
"Gignilliat free from the control of the said Thomas S. Hopkins in any manner
whatever - And the said Thomas S. Hopkins further covenants and agrees that
the said J. Elizabeth Gignilliat may dispose of said property by will to any
person or persons whom she may in that way appoint, excepting in the reversion
and remainder as may apply to the above named three /3/ following negroes
namely Asia, Tamar and Dan which said negroes were devised to the said J.
Elizabeth Gignilliat by her brother Scott Gignilliat for the time of her
natural life, and at her death without issue then and in that case to descend
to her brother Henry G. Gignilliat - it being expressly understood and agreed
that the within clause shall not in any manner or way violate or change the
conditions named in the will of the said Scott Gignilliat, so far as the said
three negroes may be concerned which would at all effect affect [sic] the
right of the said Henry G. Gignilliat under the will fo his brother Scott
Gignilliat,

[p.4]
"No. 4
"but that the said J. Elizabeth Gignilliat shall only use and possess the
right to dispose of the same by will, as afore-said, on the fulfillment of the
conditions as set forth in the will of the said Scott Gignilliat -. And the
said Thomas S. Hopkins and J. Elizabeth Gignilliat, nominate and appoint said
Henry G. Gignilliat Trustee of said property, who is authorized to possess him
self of, and control the right to said property, in any way he may decree most
for the interest of said J. Elizabeth Gignilliat. And the said Henry G.
Gignilliat, consents and agrees to his nomination and appointment of Trustee
of said property -
"In witness thereof the parties of the first, second and third parts have
hereunto set their hands and affixed their seals the day and year first above
written -

"Signed sealed andT.S. Hopkins [his seal]
delivered in presence ofJ.E. Gignilliat [her seal]
James O. ScrevenJ. Gignilliat [his seal]
R. Hazlehurst
R. Hazlehurst, Jr.

[p.5]

"No.4
"State of Georgia
Glynn County
Personally appear-
ed before me
Robt Hazlehurst, Jnr
who being duly sworn
deposeth and saith that he saw T.S. Hopkins, J.E. Gignilliat & H. Gignilliat
sign, seal and deliver the within marriage settlement for the purposes therein
contained; that the deponent subscribed the same, as a witness, and saw James
O. Screven and R. Hazlehurst do so like-wise.

"Sworn to and
subscribed before me, R. Hazlehurst, Jr.
this Nov. 23d 1847

Alexr Scranton Clk.

Recorded in Book (K) folio 171 & 172
This 1st day of Decr 1847

Alexr Scranton Clerk

6. Names from the following document are not listed in any of the above
documents. The names mentioned in this deed are not mentioned in any other
source I've seen.

John M. Gignilliat, deeds slaves to daughter J.E. Written Oct. 24, 1857.
Recorded Oct. 24, 1857. Wayne Co. Superior Ct. Deeds & Mortgages (Transcript)
Vols. A-D, 1810-1862. p.679, "old record Book G. Pages 173-74."

John M. Gignilliat of Wayne conveys to Woodford Mabry, trustee for Jane
Elizabeth Hopkins "for & in consideration of the sum of fifty dollars to him
in hand paid by the Woodford Mabry as well as in consideration of the love and
affection for his daughter Jane Elizabeth Hopkins does by these presents give
grant bargain sell & convey unto the said Woodford Mabry in trust and for the
sole use and benefit of Jane Elizabeth Hopkins and her children the following
Negro Slaves with their future issues, "Six - Susan, Eliza, Daniel, Charlie
["Charles"] Caroline & Levinia, her children
The condition of the above obligation is that the said John Gignilliat
reserves to himself the right to continue in possession of said slaves and in
full enjoyment of the service and proceeds thereof during the term of his
natural life...."

7.
1863
Will of Dr. Thomas Spalding Hopkins, made before leaving Wayne County, for
Thomas County, Ga., "where he went on a furlough from the army to buy lands &
a home and remove his family as refugees from the coast of Georgia to the
interior. Bought home in Thomasville & lands to move slaves & stock in Brooks
Co., near Morven. The family were removed to Morven and lived there several
months until they could get possession of the residence, cor. Crawford &
present Remington Ave. on Jan. 1, 1864. He bought the entire block to Jackson
& thence down present Dawson for $5,000, July, 1863. This was the last piece
of property paid for in Confederate money in Thomasville." [Note by Miss
Elizabeth Hopkins, 3,23,1940]

[p.1]
"No. 5.
"In the name of God Amen. I Thomas S. Hopkins of the County of Wayne and
State of Georgia being of sound mind and clearly understanding what I am about
to do, make and declare this my last Will and Testament.
"viz:

"1stI will and bequeath to my beloved wife Jane Elizabeth Hopkins, whose
Christian character has done so much to render me happy under all
circumstances, everything of which I may die possessed, - in the way of
property - mixed or real or personal (except that bequeathed to my son and
Daughter - Francis W. & Cecilia B. Hopkins) in fee simple to be disposed of as
she may think best upon consultation with my executor, who will always advise
her for the best.

"2ndI will and bequeath to my Son F.W. Hopkins & my Daughter C.B. Hopkins
jointly an interest of one thousand Dollars in the "Pike tract" of land re-

[p.3]
"No. 5
"cently purchased from the "Pikes" in Brooks County Ga. - I also will and
bequeath to F.W. & C.B. Hopkins the following negro men - viz: George, aged
about 45 years & Conrad his son aged about 22 years.

"I hereby constitute my brother Capt. O.C. Hopkins, my lawful executor to this
my last will and Testament -
In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and affixed my seal this 14th
day of April 1863, at Waynesville, Georgia.

Thomas S. Hopkins
(L.S.)
"Signed sealed and declared by the Testator as his last Will and Testament in
presence of us, who at his request and in his presence, and in presence of
each other have affixed our names hereto as witnesses to its due execution.
D.C. Curry
Henry R. Fort
James T. Blain"

8. Information from the memory of Octavius Hopkins, son of Dr. Thomas
Spalding Hopkins, Jan. 6, 1938. (This has been transcribed as it was
written.) Original in private collection, Atlanta, GA. "Morven" refers to a
small town in Brooks Co., GA. Although the Hopkins family lived in
Thomasville, Thomas Co., GA, their plantation was located in nearby Brooks Co.

"Neighbors at Morven were Polhills, Sharpe's (store), Dr. Hitch, Scruggs
(preacher), Snead.
"Big Camp ground (mill) - Rountrees, Halls, Lyman and Bolen. C.S.A.
"Hopkins family got off at Quitman & went abt. 10 mi. to Morven. Perkins
Place - Owned it after war - Willie [Judge William Henry Hopkins] & Tavy
[Octavius Hopkins] drove cattle up to Thomasville -
"About 100 slaves - Hopkins + Gignilliat + Jenkins, when moved from coast -
none left after war or ran away - just had to let them go -
"Some kept name of Hopkins -

"Tammany & Phoebe were native Africans Phoebe lived to be 110.

Octavius H.

1,6,'38

"Stepny Livingston bro. to George Johnson - 2 high grade negroes given to
T.S.H.
"Butler & his son, Conrad, carriage driver.
"Sandy, (wife Grace), one of the Jenkins negroes was boss on plantation.
Frank, Phoebe. Jenkins lived at Dover's Hall & that was at one time prop. of
T.S.H. Glynn Co.
"After war, down at Morven, boys & ex-soldiers sleeping on pallets saw queer
wavering light that negro said was ole Perkins ghost & if they had jes' poured
some whiskey on floor, he would'r drunk it & gone off.
"Light probably torch light of hunter or passers by that moved across room as
they moved on-"

Endnotes:

Will of Dr. Thomas Spalding Hopkins, made on April 14, 1863, "before leaving
Wayne County, for Thomas County, Ga., where he went on a furlough from the
army to buy lands & a home and remove his family as refugees from the coast of
Georgia to the interior." This was not his final will.

[Morven - Information from the memory of Octavius Hopkins, Jan. 6, 1938.]

Will of William D. Jenkins of Glynn County, GA, written 1858.

Book D, 1810-1843, Glynn Co. Ordinary Estate Records, Wills, Inventories and
Appraisements. p.137. She is also recorded as Louise on p.137.

Book D, 1810-1843, Glynn Co. Ordinary Estate Records, Wills, Inventories and
Appraisements. p.144.

Book D, 1810-1843, Glynn Co. Ordinary Estate Records, Wills, Inventories and
Appraisements. p.144.

Book E, 1844-1853, Glynn Co. Ordinary Estate Records, Wills, Inventories and
Appraisements. p.20.

Book E, 1844-1853, Glynn Co. Ordinary Estate Records, Wills, Inventories and
Appraisements. p.173.

Book E, 1844-1853, Glynn Co. Ordinary Estate Records, Wills, Inventories and
Appraisements. p.173.

Messages In This Thread

GA Family (Slave Data)
Re: GA Family (Slave Data)

18 Dec 2002 :: 14 Nov 2008
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