Join the Genealogy Revolution.
Search for your surname in the largest DNA database of its kind!

My Surname


Footnote.com

Banner - Family Tree Maker 2008

Domain Name Registration at GoDaddy.com 120x60


AfriGeneas Slave Research Forum

Carter/Nomony Hall
In Response To: Re: Cancer Plantation Slaves ()

In the earlier posting of surnames of individuals listed on Robert Carter emancipation documents, I mentioned John Bardens dissertation on the subject.

Here's the reference.
Title: "FLUSHED WITH NOTIONS OF FREEDOM": THE GROWTH AND EMANCIPATION OF A VIRGINIA SLAVE COMMUNITY, 1732-1812 (CARTER FAMILY)
Author(s): BARDEN, JOHN RANDOLPH
Degree: PH.D.
Year: 1993
Pages: 00730
Institution: DUKE UNIVERSITY; 0066
Advisor: Supervisor: PETER H. WOOD
Source: DAI, 55, no. 02A, (1993): 0356
Abstract: On August 1, 1791, Robert Carter III, master of the Nomony Hall estate in Virginia, signed a deed that led to the gradual emancipation of 511 enslaved African-Americans living on his plantations, plus their descendants. No other single instance of manumission on such a large scale is known to have occurred within the United States prior to 1861.

Using the correspondence and plantation records of the Carter family, as well as Virginia court and tax records, this study follows the development of the Nomony Hall slave community from its beginnings in the 1720s and 1730s to the period of the emancipation in the 1790s and 1800s. Intensive case studies of this kind can augment more general studies of the experience of enslaved families in eighteenth-century Virginia and can deepen our understanding of the early African-American experience and the dynamics of race slavery.

Despite the traumas of the Middle Passage, African-Americans in the Nomony Hall community soon formed new kinship ties and friendships, adapting African patterns to their new circumstances. They also provided skills needed for the successful operation of the estate and developed considerable adroitness in negotiating with members of the slaveholding class for amelioration of the conditions of slavery.

The 1770s saw new opportunities open for the African-Americans at Nomony Hall. Some used the turmoil produced by the American Revolution to escape from the estate. Others took advantage of the egalitarian nature of the evangelical religion then spreading through the region to interact with their master on more nearly even terms. However, this promising decade was followed by economic and agricultural disruptions in the 1780s, leading to sales and forced moves of many African-Americans in the estate and breaking many of the ties that bound them together.

The last chapters describe the difficulties that the members of the Nomony Hall community had to confront in establishing themselves as free people in the face of a hostile slaveholding elite. The success of the Nomony Hall emancipation plan demonstrated the weakness of slaveholders' arguments that free black people could not be a productive part of Southern society.

SUBJECT(S)
Descriptor: HISTORY, UNITED STATES
SOCIOLOGY, ETHNIC AND RACIAL STUDIES
ANTHROPOLOGY, CULTURAL

Accession No: AAG9416895
Database: Dissertations


18 Dec 2002 :: 14 Nov 2008
Copyright © 2002-2008 by AfriGeneas. All rights reserved.
AfriGeneas ~ African Ancestored Genealogy