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Re: Mack/Lewis/Wills family odd mystery

I am not related, and I fear that this post may create more mysteries than it solves, but I am hoping that this (sorry!) extremely long post may give you some clues. I am fairly certain that everyone mentioned here is related to you in some way, although I haven't figured out exactly how in all cases... It does, however, show that Hannah Lewis was indeed Frances Mack's mother.

All of these letters to the editor appeared in the (New Orleans, LA) Southwestern Christian Advocate, in the "Lost Friends" column.

Hope this helps!

June 24, 1880:
Dear Editor – I wish to inquire for a nephew, of whom I have not heard in two years. The last I heard of him he wrote a letter to me at Allen P.O., La.; but at the time he wrote I was in New Orleans, going to school at Straight University, so I did not get his letter until I came back. I wrote immediately to Plaquemine P.O., Iberville parish. His mother’s name is Frances Mack; grandmother’s Hannah Lewis. All his relatives are here at Allen except one brother and sister, Daniel E. Brown and Charlotte Crenchnalle, who are at Louisville, Kentucky. He was a tall, spare-made fellow, light complected, and had a very favorable countenance, and was about 20 years of age. My father’s name is William Price; he and mother separated during the war. Write to me at Allen, Natchitoches parish, La. D.J. PRICE
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August 31, 1882:
DEAR EDITOR: I would like to find my nephew, Robert Brown, who left New Orleans, Oct. 20, 1877, for Louisville, Ky. He stopped at Plaquemines, La., and wrote me two letters, but as I was out of the city teaching school at the time, they were not answered until my return home. I wrote but did not receive a reply. I have not heard from him since, although I have traveled and made inquiries at river cities. Address me at Allen, La. D.J. PRICE
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December 14, 1882:
Identical text as the letter published on August 31, 1882.
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January 4, 1883:
Identical text as the letter published on August 31, 1882.
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February 1, 1883:
Identical text as the letter published on August 31, 1882.
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June 7, 1883:
Dear Editor: - I am inquiring for my people I left in Georgia, Burke county, eleven miles from Waynesboro. I left one brother named Richard Luster, one Robert Lewis. My mother named Mariah Lewis; sisters Sarah and Hannah Lewis – they are here. Robert was sold to a man by the name of Drury Coker. Richard belonged to an old lady called Widow Munroe. I left them a few years before the war; was brought here by Mr. Joe Martin where I have been ever since. Address Louis Martin, Asbury M.E. Church, care Rev. H.J. Wright, Natchitoches, La.
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July 14, 1881:
DEAR EDITOR: I desire some information about my people. I left them near Warrenton, in Fauquier county, Virginia. Their names were Eliza and Lucinda. Our mother was Patsy. We belonged to John Martin. I was sold and brought to Louisiana by a speculator. In Virginia they called me Daniel Martin, but I now go by the name of Daniel Lewis. Tidings of my sisters would be gratefully received, at Allen, La. REV. DANIEL LEWIS
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July 14, 1881:
DEAR EDITOR: I wish to inquire for my father’s people – his mother and two brothers. One was John Price, whom he left at Jerusalem, a little village in Virginia, near Chesapeake Bay. I am a public school teacher at Allen and Clarksville, La. D.J. PRICE
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January 4, 1883:
MR EDITOR: - I wish to know the whereabouts of my Uncles, my Father’s brothers, three in number. Names – John Price, Jesse Price, and the other he did not know the name. My father’s name is Wm. Price; he left his parents’ home when 12 years of age, by the traders to New Orleans, and stayed there six months, when a farmer by the name of A.G. Jordan bought him and brought him to a plantation in Louisiana on Bayou Taplacat and in the village of Allen, La., and he has been living within 12 miles of this town, until last August 15th, when he passed through the dark valley of the shadow of death by the penetration of 12 bullets. He said he left his brothers and parents in Fairfax, Virginia. Please write me at Allen, Natchitoches parish, La. D.J. PRICE
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May 6, 1886:
MR. EDITOR: Please allow me space in your consolating paper once more to inquire for the whereabouts of my father’s relatives, whom he left in Virginia. He said he left them when quite young, about 16 years old I suppose; he left his people in Richmond, Va.; was sold to the traders and brought to New Orleans, La., and sold to a man by the name of A.G. Jordan, who he served until freedom, who farmed on Red River lands at a village now known as Allen, 7 or 8 miles from the river, 5 miles from Spanish lake. He has not seen or heard of any of his people since he left Richmond. He said there were four brothers of them, and three sisters, whose names were as follows: John, James or Jessie and himself, William Price; don’t remember his sisters’ names. My father has been dead four years; I was not with him when he died; but when he left me he told me to inquire until I found his people. He also left a father and mother in Virginia. Address D.J. Price, Fortson, La.


18 Dec 2002 :: 14 Nov 2008
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