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AfriGeneas Military Research Forum Archive

Re: WHERE ARE PENSION RECORDS
In Response To: WHERE ARE PENSION RECORDS ()

Your right, there are lots of Daniel Adams-doing some basic searches found 7 in the CWSS systems-and of those, if he was in the USCT at all, the likeliest regiments to check would be the 4th cav, which was organized from the 1st corps d'afrique in New Orleans, the 64th and 67th infantries, and the 95th, just looking from the potential of proximity.

There are 456 Daniel Adams in the pension indices, so without more information, that's kind of a dead end.

Looking at the closest census records-assuming he stayed in Miss, and using the information you gave-the likeliest of the 16 in Mississippi for 1880, was the Daniel Adams, Black-in Monroe County. He was listed as 50 years old, which would be reasonable. (Unless you know 1834 as a solid date, and you are looking for potentials, don't discount the difference in age yet) He was recorded as being born in Alabama, with both parents born in Virginia, worked as a farmer, and was illiterate. His wife, Mary was 36, born in Mississippi, both parents born in Virginia. The six children were all born in Mississippi. They are: Dock, son 16, Jack, son 14, Sam, son 12, Lee, son 5, Mary E, dau. 3, and Lucinda, dau. age 2. Barring childhood death, or early death from other causes-at least the youngest three would most likely still be living in the 1950's. Depending on your own age-and any of your siblings, cousins or parents, someone may recognize some of the names.

If this person is the correct Daniel-the children would be your great uncles and aunts, and gives you some further leads to check. Do any of those names seem familiar to you-or to members of your family??

Remember, that obviously not all Black men of appropriate age served in the Union army. Various numbers recorded give from 160-200,000, with the average estimated at between 160 and 180,000 men. That's a lot, but thousands more served as civilian laborers for the army, and other departments. Again, obviously many thousands never served, many thousands more were impressed into service with the Confederates as slave labor-cooks, laborers, etc.

Best of luck with your search-and perhaps looking at other relatives in that line will give you more information on your great great grandfather, and whether or not he was a soldier.

Sharon


18 Dec 2002 :: 14 Nov 2008
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