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AfriGeneas Military Research Forum Archive

Re: Poison Spring Massacre
In Response To: Re: Poison Spring Massacre ()

Lloyd,

It is useless to argue with someone who has continually proven to be consistent only in their inaccuracies and lack of insight. Most of us have given up on paying attention to the infamous "one name's" puerile outbursts. You will never get an intelligent response from that direction, only hype and rhetoric.

Re: Poison Spring. Just a couple of notes. First, the Official Records have conflicting numbers of dead and wounded. Col. Williams reported 92 killed, 97 wounded and 106 missing. "Many of those reported missing are supposed to be killed. Others are supposed to be wounded and prisoners."

The official report lists 438 men and officers of the 1st Ks. engaged, 117 killed and wounded, and 65 wounded. The total for the battle was listed as 1,170 officers and men, 204 killed and wounded and 97 wounded. None listed as missing.

500 men of the 1st Kansas Colored had been on a foraging expedition. 100 loaded wagons and a "large part of the command under Major Ward" was sent back to Camden. The remainder, under Col. Williams met reinforcements at the Crossroads, which increased the command to 875 infantry and 285 cavalry, BUT! " the excessive fatigue of the preceding day, coming as it did at the close of a toilsome march of twenty-four days, without halting, had so worn upon the infantry that fully 100 of the 1st Kansas Colored were rendered unfit from duty.

Per Major Ward, "Out of 78 hours preceding the action, sixty three hours were spent by the entire command on duty, besides a heavy picket guard being furnished for the remaining 15 hours,...the rations were of necessity exceedingly short for more than a week previous to the battle." (The reason for the foraging party in the first place.)

Confederate forces were estimated at being between 5 and 6 thousand men-odds of 5-6 to one, with the additional advantage of location, firepower and surprise. Completely flanked on both sides, it was a slaughter.


18 Dec 2002 :: 14 Nov 2008
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