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AfriGeneas Free Persons of Color Forum

Re: William Goyens, mulatto freeman NC-TX
In Response To: Re: William Goyens ()

FYI:

William Goyens is indexed in the 1850 census:

Name: William Gayan
Age: 55
Estimated Birth Year: 1794
Birth Place: North Carolina
Gender: Male
Race: M
Home in 1850
(City,County,State): Not Stated, Nacogdoches, Texas
Page: 77
Roll: M432_913

Check record to see that the actual record says "Goyens".

Contrary to current "Melungeon" mythology, Goyens has been well researched- see one history below. Constructions of "Melungeon" are understandable due to the historical racial climate here in the Americas, and the continued resistance to accept partial African ancestry of some proponants of the more recent theories abounding on the internet can also be esplained in light of that history.

Be that as it may - I have no problem understanding that those people who currently live as white, or have opted to reconstruct their ethnicity to exclude those forebears who were African-ancestored make those choices - to each his own. To have an African ancestor doesn't make someone an African-American. But to deny history, to me is rather sad, and only highlights the continuance of racialist attitudes in the present.

A brief history:

GOYENS, WILLIAM (1794-1856). William Goyens (or Goings), early Nacogdoches settler and businessman, was born in Moore County, North Carolina, in 1794, the son of William Goings, a free mulatto, and a white woman. He came to Texas in 1820 and lived at Nacogdoches for the rest of his life. Although he could not write much beyond his signature, he was a good businessman. He was a blacksmith and wagonmaker and engaged in hauling freight from Natchitoches, Louisiana. On a trip to Louisiana in 1826, he was seized by William English, who sought to sell him into slavery. In return for his liberty, Goyens was induced to deliver to English his slave woman and to sign a note agreeing to peonage for himself, though reserving the right to trade on his own behalf. After his return to Nacogdoches, he successfully filed suit for annulment of these obligations.

During the Mexican Texas era, Goyens often served as conciliator in the settlement of lawsuits under the Mexican laws. He was appointed as agent to deal with the Cherokees, and on numerous occasions he negotiated treaties with the Comanches and other Indians, for he was trusted not only by them but also by the Mexicans and Anglo-Americans in East Texas. He also operated an inn in connection with his home near the site of what is now the courthouse in Nacogdoches. In 1832 he married Mary Pate Sibley, who was white. Sibley had one son, Henry Sibley, by a former marriage, but Goyens and Mary had no children.

During the Texas Revolution, Goyens was given the important task of keeping the Cherokees friendly with the Texans, and he was interpreter with Gen. Sam Houston and his party in negotiating a treaty. After the revolution he purchased what was afterwards known as Goyens' Hill, four miles west of Nacogdoches. He built a large two-story mansion with a sawmill and gristmill west of his home on Moral Creek, where he and his wife lived until their deaths. During his later life Goyens amassed considerable wealth in real estate, despite constant efforts by his white neighbors to take away what he was accumulating. He always employed the best lawyers in Nacogdoches, including Thomas J. Rusk and Charles S. Taylor, to defend him and was generally successful in his litigation. He died on June 20, 1856, soon after the death of his wife; they were both buried in a cemetery near the junction of Aylitos Creek with the Moral. At his grave a marker was erected by the Texas Centennial Commission in 1936. Many traditions grew up in Nacogdoches about this unusual man, and sometimes it is hard to tell just what is true and what is tradition.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: Bexar Archives, Barker Texas History Center, University of Texas at Austin. Robert Bruce Blake Research Collection, Steen Library, Stephen F. Austin State University; Barker Texas History Center, University of Texas at Austin; Texas State Archives, Austin; Houston Public Library, Houston. Nacogdoches Archives, Steen Library, Stephen F. Austin State University; Barker Texas History Center, University of Texas at Austin; Texas State Archives, Austin.

R. B. Blake


18 Dec 2002 :: 14 Nov 2008
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